Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization - Clinical Course 'A'

The Prague School of Rehabilitation

Course Description

The etiology of musculoskeletal pain is often evaluated from an anatomical and biomechanical standpoint, and the influence of external forces (i.e. loading) acting on the spine. What is often missing is the evaluation of internal forces induced by the patients own musculature. The stabilizing function of muscles plays a critical and decisive postural role, which in turn, is dependent on the quality of central nervous system (CNS) control. Kolar's approach to Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) is a new and unique approach explaining the importance of the neurophysiological principles of the movement system. The DNS encompasses principles of developmental kinesiology during the 1st year of the life; these principles define ideal posture, breathing stereotypes and functional joint centration from a neurodevelopmental paradigm. DNS presents a critical set of functional tests to analyze the quality of functional stability of the spinal and joint stabilizers, and to assist in finding the key link of dysfunction. The stabilization training approach is based on ontogenetic global postural-locomotor patterns. The primary goal is to optimize distribution of internal forces of the muscles acting on each segment of the spine and/or any other joint. In the DNS training concept, client education and participation are imperative to reinforce ideal coordination among all stabilizing muscles to achieve the best sport performance.

Course Objectives

  1. Improve understanding of the basic principles of developmental kinesiology with an emphasis on development during the first year of life
  2. Identify and describe key milestones in human development
  3. Introduce the three level of sensorimotor control in functional assessment and treatment
  4. Demonstrate the relationship between development during the first year of life and pathology of the locomotor system in adulthood
  5. Introduce new terminology pertinent to rehabilitation such as functional joint centration, punctum fixum, punctum mobile and the integrated stabilizing system of the spine
  6. Define ideal postural stabilization from a developmental perspective: intra-abdominal pressure regulation, dual role of the diaphragm in stabilization and respiration, stabilization via co-contraction
  7. Identify common stereotypes of faulty postural stabilization (“open scissors syndrome”, forward drown posture, backward drown posture, “hour glass syndrome”)
  8. Explain and demonstrate biomechanics of homologous, ipsilateral and contralateral postural-locomotion patterns; closed and opened kinematic chains, stepping forward and supporting function
  9. Evaluate and correct poor respiratory patterns
  10. Demonstrate the correlation between poor respiration patterns and functional pathology of the locomotor system
  11. Assess the integrated stabilizing system of the spine both visually and utilizing dynamic functional tests
  12. Integrate corrective exercises based on the DNS functional tests and developmental positions: exercise in homologous static positions; position transfer during locomotor function; exercise progression using unstable surfaces; increased difficulty of the exercises utilizing resistance, dual tasking and other challenges
  13. Clarify how DNS corrective exercises can integrate with other exercise strategies
  14. Cover the basics of application of DNS concept in sport training
  15. Provide basic clinical management explanation for clinicians to better integrate the DNS approach in their regular practice, including patient education
Start date
End date
Date note
Course Times:

Friday: 8:30am-5pm
Saturday: 8:30am-5pm
Sunday: 8:00am-1:30pm
Type
Other
Event cost
995
Format
In person
Location

Vancouver BC
Canada

Posting Expiry Date

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