Physiotherapists provide services across a variety of different environments while maintaining a set of professional roles.

    Professional roles have been developed for each of the basic elements of the profession: clinical practice, research and education:

    • Clinical practice includes many types of physiotherapeutic care - preventive, acute, rehabilitative, and maintenance
    • Research is undertaken to try to find ways of improving the quality of care and stimulating development in all aspects of the physiotherapy profession
    • Education is an essential component of the profession at several levels - undergraduate and graduate university programs, as well as continuing education programs

    See below for an outline of different ways a physiotherapist may be compensated: 

    • Hospitals and Home Care: Physiotherapists working in public practice have their salary an benefits determined by the Health Sciences Association of BC (HSABC) collective agreement. Salaries range from $58,000-94,000, with an additional 20% in benefits.
    • Private Practice: Most private practice physiotherapists are Self-Employed or Commissioned Employees whose income does not include benefits. Income depends on the size of the caseload, which is up to the physiotherapist. A full-time income ranges from $70,000-120,000+, and includes no benefits (no vacation, mat leave, sick days, health insurance, etc). Most patients’ treatments are fully or partially insured by WorkSafe, ICBC, MSP, Pacific Blue Cross, SunLife, etc.
    • Physiotherapy Assistants, or Support Workers: Visit WelcomeBC for an overview

    Physiotherapists provide services across a variety of different environments while maintaining a set of professional roles.

    Work environments include, but are not limited to:

    • Private clinics
    • Hospitals
    • Rehabilitation centres
    • Long-term care
    • Home care programs
    • Schools
    • Child development centres
    • Public health units
    • Industry
    • Recreation centres